Getting a flat tire signs

Getting a flat tire signs

  • #1

i was curious about what it feels like to get a flat on a bike. often times i find myself thinking when i’m riding about if i were to get a flat. sometimes when riding i’ll encounter those bad patches of road and i’ll think maybe i’m getting a flat, but then realize its just the road. what does it actually feel like though, is there a huge loss in control, and wobbling? any difference if its the rear or front tire?

You're reading: Getting a flat tire signs

i’d like to know what signs to look for if i ever get a flat i know its a flat and ride to the side or something…that is if its hard to notice.

  • #2

never had a catastrophic blowout but a slow loss of pressure from a nail feels like the brakes are dragging and its really hard to turn. the bike will just want to go straight. nothing too scary though.

  • #3

they start wallowing around, if they go down slow. things just get all mushy feeling. i’ve had a blowout at 90 plus, scared the shit out of me.

  • #4

never had a motorcycle flat myself, but i’ve had a few on bicycles.

go deflate the back tire of your bicycle and ride around for 5 minutes… it won’t be the same, but it will be similar. reinflate the back and deflate the front. ride around for a few minutes again.

my guess is that basically, every maneuver will be more difficult to perform. turning stiffens, moving straight, the flat tire will try to catch grooves and bumps in the road more easily, and you’ll feel like you’re needing to give it more power to go.

  • #5

i had a rear tire go out on me while riding to work on 880 in oakland. it wasn’t fun but it wasn’t as eventful as i thought it was going to be. this was in early morning commute traffic (6am), so i was going 70+ mph. i lost pressure rapidly as i felt the back end drop slightly then it started slowly sliding around on me. every steering input felt exaggerated and i had to put a lot more work into keeping the bike straight. i backed off on the throttle and made my way from the fast lane to the side of the road, which took a bit. i was very cautious when stopping as i didn’t want to dump the bike.

when i got to the side of the road, i checked the tire for damage. some how my valve stem got a cut in it, which explained the rapid deflation, and the tire was pretty much destroyed. the kit i had to fix a flat was going to do me no good, so i had the bike towed. i have the ama moto-tow and they had a flat bed truck there within an hour. a few hundred dollars later and i was back on the road.

  • #6

it has felt different every flat i’ve had, but the pucker always feels the same.

  • #8

i’ve had several pinch flats on the mx track. front ones suck because you only realize something is wrong when your flying over the handle bars.

  • #9

i’ve had several pinch flats on the mx track. front ones suck because you only realize something is wrong when your flying over the handle bars.

or you are hearing the rim hit rocks through the flat tire.

  • #10

it feels like youre rearend is sliding around (smoosh, smoosh, smoosh)! getting a flat tire signs

are we talking flats or running knobby tires on the street?

what you said pretty much describes my experience running an irc gp1 knobby on the rear wheel. felt like the back end was very loose on every turn.

getting a flat tire signs

  • #11

are we talking flats or running knobby tires on the street?

getting a flat tire signs

flats on hwy 5 – definitely an uh oh moment!

  • #12

you wake up at the hospital and everyone tells you not to worry about your (totaled) motorcycle you ‘lucky’ to be alive.

  • #13

the rate at which the air leaks out is 100% unpredictable. therefore, any advice given about tires going down has to be taken accordingly.

a *slow* leak in the front tire will manifest itself as a vague feeling while normal steering inputs are unable to change the direction of the bike. you’ll find yourself with the getting a flat tire signs response when the bike continues to go straight after you try to turn. very dangerous. if you experience this, do not use the front brake or any sudden steering inputs. realize that you need to stop as soon as you can safely- this means finding a place to pull over right away. if you’re on the freeway, gradually make your way to the right. do not panic- that will only make the situation worse. if the rear tire is going down, the tail of the bike will feel like it’s drunk. it will sway and wiggle because the tire sidewall is flexing so much. it can feel like someone is pushing you from the side. do not use the rear brake. pull over as safely as you can. the handling should still be fair, as the front tire will still steer provided it has adequate pressure.

realize that a low tire pressure condition can cause a sudden pressure loss, as the bike is now extremely vulnerable to bending the rim where the tire bead seats itself. if you hit a pothole or something with a sharp edge in the road, it can cause the bead to pop which will promptly cause major trouble.

6 out of 7 bikes that come through my shop have under-inflated tires. the best thing you can do is check your pressures weekly. if you see a low reading, inspect the tread carefully to see if there’s anything stuck in the rubber. slow leaks happen. if you see something shiny, it’s most likely metal and that area can be leaking. spray a shot of windex on it and look for bubbles.

Read more: U.S. tire shipments by category 2020 | Statista

  • #14

thursday at 5:00 p.m. leaving the post office, i had a red triangle on the instrument panel. what is that, i thought. then i saw the tpm for the rear wheel, 27 pounds. then, as i pulled over, the rear tire felt mushy. sure enough, a roofing nail.
but, i had stopped in front of a tire shop. i pulled in and got a string patch, $7.
now i don’t know if i should get a new tire or trust it. the motorcycle tire shop said they won’t patch a second time, makes the hole too big.
now i carry my patch kit on the bike. but i don’t have a pump. i need to get one.
dc

  • #15

slow leaks in the front makes steering very hard and not responsive(i’ve not had a front go flat..knock on wood). rears i’ve had a few times. the feeling i’ve gotten is like riding in heavy winds. the rear seems to have a mind of own.

what is important i like to convey is that anytime you have a bad feeling something is wrong? pull over asap to asset the situation.

the few times i did not listen to my inner voice something is amidst? i nearly had a very , very bad day if not for sheer luck.

so, i’ve learn to listen and take that little extra time to look over when that gut feeling tells me something is wrong.

a while ago, i heard a popped. check my bike by swerving left and right, but felt nothing is wrong. bounced up and down on my bike and everything seems fine at the speeds i was traveling.

i was on a bike that had an inner tube. decided to listen(not often enough)to my inner voice. what i found after pulling over and propping the rear on the center stand to turn the rear tire.

turns out i ran over a long square-like rock that had went through an almost new rear tire and had actually made it through both side of the inner tube. yet, held air inside because i had ridden about five minutes without any leakage.

so, learn to listen to your inner voice.getting a flat tire signs

  • #16

the handling gets sloppy, and not in a good way. some years back i had an underinflated front tire (the valve core had gotten loose) which seemed to want to deflect on a tangent off of the numerous freeway potholes versus merely running over them. for slow leaks the rear has a kind of vague feeling — good traction but it feels like every lean angle is a squared-off spot. also some years back i had a quick deflation issue on the rear (big gash) which instantly made precise steering input difficult.

  • #17

i ran into a carpenter knife lane splitting on 101 at shoreline a few years back when they had the big construction going on. the rear tire (luckily it was the rear) was instantaneously flat and started spinning. after i caught it i slowly but surely made my way over to the right (no left shoulder) having to go up an 2 inch edge (they were adding a new layer to the surface of some lanes at that time).
more spinning trying to do it with the rim moving from one side to the other of the wall.
i would say this was a pretty unlucky flat. normally, you don’t find yourself in a situation like that and if you are a somewhat experienced rider you feel the change in tire pressure and have enough time to safely pull over.

  • #18

the rope plugs will last the life of the tire. i also recommend that you carry this kit! i have one in my camelback (yea-i know…i won’t buy another but it
writings)

http://www.genuineinnovations.com/motorcycle_atv.html

thursday at 5:00 p.m. leaving the post office, i had a red triangle on the instrument panel. what is that, i thought. then i saw the tpm for the rear wheel, 27 pounds. then, as i pulled over, the rear tire felt mushy. sure enough, a roofing nail.

but, i had stopped in front of a tire shop. i pulled in and got a string patch, $7.

now i don’t know if i should get a new tire or trust it. the motorcycle tire shop said they won’t patch a second time, makes the hole too big.

now i carry my patch kit on the bike. but i don’t have a pump. i need to get one.

dc

Source: http://tonupboys.com
Category: Motocycle Tires