Brake for Moose campaign kicks into high gear

Brake for Moose campaign kicks into high gear
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Brake for Moose campaign kicks into high gear
Behemoths are traveling far and broad for mates in fall

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Each year, there are roughly 250 moose-related accidents in the Granite State, many resulting in injuries or death to drivers and passengers.While the population seems to be declining due to tick infestations, the fall presents particular problems to motorists because the bulls are searching long and hard for mates.That can lead to traffic trouble, peculiarly at night.After a request from Littleton Regional Hospital hand brake room doctor Dr. Campbell McLaren to investigate methods for preventing moose-vehicle collisions, the NH Fish and Game Department, NH Department of Transportation and State of New Hampshire Highway Safety Agency developed a comprehensive outreach plan to reduce both the number and badness of these accidents.It includes increased highway unhorse ; placement of scrolling-message highway signs in areas where the most accidents have occurred ; the production of a driver-education video ; distribution of “ Brake for Moose ” bumper stickers ; public overhaul announcements and news releases.This past week, one of those news releases was distributed, reminding motorists that this is a particularly dangerous prison term of year.New Hampshire ‘s award-winning “ Brake for Moose ” campaign is a collaborative campaign of the NH Fish and Game Department, NH Department of Transportation and State of New Hampshire Highway Safety Agency.They urge drivers to use circumspection when on the roads, specially at dusk and dawn.Here is some important data to keep in judgment when driving in New Hampshire : – The average elk weighs 1,000 pounds.- Moose are unvoiced to see at night. They are six feet tall at the shoulder and your headlights will much entirely reveal their legs, which are the lapp color as the pavement.- Their altitude besides means that if you hit one, the bulk of a elk will fall on your windshield and roof.- Do n’t count on seeing “ eye radiance. ” Moose eyes do reflect clean, but your headlights wo n’t reach that high.- From April to November, elk are identical active and the highest numbers of moose-vehicle collisions occur.- In bounce, yearlings have merely been separated from their mothers and are apposite to show up anywhere at anytime.- In fall, moose are on the affect because it is their checkmate season.- Moose are attracted to salt licks caused by winter road management, so it is not surprise to see them on or very near the road.Fish and Game Moose Project Leader Kris Rines said most collisions happen at click or twilight, but they can happen at any time of day. “ Collisions occur statewide and on all types of roads, from highways to back roads, ” she said. “ Try not to drive faster than 55 miles per hour. There is a strong correlation between travel rapidly and the severity of an accident. “ She besides recommended habit of a seat belt out and use of high beams whenever potential. “ Do n’t count on elk stopping when they see you. They are identical unpredictable. Stop the car if necessity and wait. Be particularly heedful and drive slowly where elk road crossing signs are posted. But remember elk cross the road wherever they like ! “ 19003418
Each year, there are approximately 250 moose-related accidents in the Granite State, many resulting in injuries or death to drivers and passengers. While the population seems to be declining due to tick infestations, the fall presents particular problems to motorists because the bulls are searching retentive and hard for mates .

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That can lead to traffic trouble, peculiarly at night. After a request from Littleton Regional Hospital emergency room doctor Dr. Campbell McLaren to investigate methods for preventing moose-vehicle collisions, the NH Fish and Game Department, NH Department of Transportation and State of New Hampshire Highway Safety Agency developed a comprehensive outreach plan to reduce both the number and badness of these accidents. It includes increase highway ignite ; placement of scrolling-message highway signs in areas where the most accidents have occurred ; the production of a driver-education video ; distribution of “ Brake for Moose ” bumper stickers ; public service announcements and news releases. This past week, one of those news releases was distributed, reminding motorists that this is a particularly dangerous time of class .
New Hampshire ‘s award-winning “ Brake for Moose ” campaign is a collaborative feat of the NH Fish and Game Department, NH Department of Transportation and State of New Hampshire Highway Safety Agency. They urge drivers to use caution when on the roads, particularly at twilight and dawn. here is some important information to keep in mind when driving in New Hampshire : – The average elk weighs 1,000 pounds.
– elk are heavily to see at night. They are six feet tall at the shoulder and your headlights will often only reveal their legs, which are the like tinge as the paving.
– Their height besides means that if you hit one, the bulge of a elk will fall on your windshield and ceiling.
– Do n’t count on seeing “ eye reflect. ” Moose eyes do reflect light, but your headlights wo n’t reach that senior high school.
– From April to November, elk are very active and the highest numbers of moose-vehicle collisions occur.
– In jump, yearlings have good been separated from their mothers and are apt to show up anywhere at anytime.
– In fall, moose are on the motivate because it is their match season.
– elk are attracted to salt licks caused by winter road management, so it is not storm to see them on or very near the road. fish and Game Moose Project Leader Kris Rines said most collisions happen at dawn or twilight, but they can happen at any time of day. “ Collisions occur statewide and on all types of roads, from highways to back roads, ” she said. “ Try not to drive faster than 55 miles per hour. There is a hard correlation coefficient between speed and the asperity of an accident. ” She besides recommended use of a buttocks belt and practice of high beams whenever possible.

“ Do n’t count on elk stopping when they see you. They are very unpredictable. Stop the car if necessity and delay. Be particularly attentive and drive lento where elk road thwart signs are posted. But remember elk cross the road wherever they like ! ”

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Category : Car Brakes