What is a clincher tire? – Pinkbike Forum

What is a clincher tire? – Pinkbike Forum
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What is a clincher tire? - Pinkbike Forum Sayshell

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Posted: Oct 20, 2020 at 18:04 Quote
I did some googling and I still can’t understand what it is. When I compare my tubeless clincher tires to non-clincher tires, the clinchers bead much stronger. It takes an extra 20PSI to make the tire bead to the rim, and when I land sideways or spin hard on my bike the clincher is virtually impossible to burp, where as a normal tubeless tire will spray sealant sometimes. It seems to be a lot better, I am trying to figure out if it’s because these tires are clinchers, or if they are just better tires.

What is a clincher tire? - Pinkbike Forum the-one1

Posted: Oct 21, 2020 at 6:55 Quote
https://completetri.com/clincher-vs-tubular-bike-tires/

What is a clincher tire? - Pinkbike Forum Sayshell

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Posted: Oct 21, 2020 at 7:11 Quote
the-one1 wrote:
https://completetri.com/clincher-vs-tubular-bike-tires/

That’s what I read, but the road bike info isn’t helpful and doesn’t apply to mountain bikes, as Maxxis makes tubeless clincher tires I think. The article starts off by saying you need an inner tube. Here is an example. Maybe world wide cyclery just has their info wrong?

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Minion-DHF-Tire-Maxxis-Minion-DHF-Tire-24-x-2-4-Clincher-Folding-Black/+61404532026?epid=+61404532026&_trkparms=ispr%3D1&hash=item3b4ef72751:g:is4AAOSwm39fa7Ig&amdata=enc%3AAQAFAAACcBaobrjLl8XobRIiIML1V4Imu%252Fn%252BzU5L90Z278x5ickkrDx%252B2NLp21dg6hHbHAkGMe%252BqmesXQcT%252FpnDHUNKmSCdQNlfwaK3PCLrGxovjggoJvhoppG5LetL4Au6SKuq%252BmF5LkPHVChwrzqxS9J2kM8QDuGgcvDYxPPhNi1JUWJJptw8nkYtlat51CvdRh2C636YBT%252Bsgek5NhM5nlpFTrFhKoCOPZuubJ3RMmiRqGussWb5fVGtTuiD5RvZFVOoAQe3IzARRWmmWxCxRGkVPbwSQ5npVyJO10RCwZANDb2fTpQmJlrYHOESS1kcpc1sL%252FhSYPEa%252BlFDp4vuUJ9qw5kpada3pc%252FyQZGhCGpCCJoVHlk4G2Nnu9NSjT03RSzTeg67H7FfLAqqfz7W0uO0A9UKGTa3FiPqSW27x7mgOZzZ4ODG%252B85hJNwJSbDeUlRqmGqsQwLqnm4v0C%252Fml%252Fl5icuRT9Ktft91Fo1aXcVfFTV0WgHFsQpZblh6Ho3ylL93mN%252BDdEgTIpIjcDKybwNIrS8W4iWvlSlzOBnvj1lZboEMSIdKrvK8cp0TjPMHdSdWDzh0YRIch%252FEFhKTyWN8Rmh5N2FtEOifDK42qQNioo9a0AeprKd9OoY7wSkJa1apyl8f%252BwfbAe2c79s3oLeBm9fxLov5Pg3U%252FbFThcMCRQ3keozosK4IabBEiiUrM7UTAN4rLbJ1Cq1Wc9CKv9LS59glGwXcGN94ruZmdrEhRkwaPyQKnZ2TCvaTHC2KDDDZl2N1khUJxNFhIPvKz9DnQz%252B2u1%252BpQm%252BLFRXKvkEua3Y9VwMPXFKHuQ%252BwsRmFi1oO60Uw%253D%253D%7Ccksum%3A+614045320265e5a080240fb4449bd74cb8f0f752efa%7Campid%3APL_CLK%7Cclp%3A2334524


What is a clincher tire? - Pinkbike Forum the-one1

Posted: Oct 21, 2020 at 8:15 Quote
You’re confusing “clincher”, “tubular” and “tubeless”

Tubular: Its a tire in the form of a tube that is glued onto a rim

Clincher: Its a tire that clinches into a rim, hence the term “clincher”. Cars, motorcycles and basically every tire you see is a clincher.

Tubeless: Its a tire being run without an inner tube. Car tires are tubeless. Tubular can be tube or tubeless. Clinchers can also be tube or tubeless.

Some tires hold onto the rim better than others. Some are loose and can be easily popped in/out. Others are hard and takes a lot of force to break open the bead.


What is a clincher tire? - Pinkbike Forum Sayshell

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Posted: Oct 21, 2020 at 9:00 Quote
the-one1 wrote:
You’re confusing “clincher”, “tubular” and “tubeless”

Tubular: Its a tire in the form of a tube that is glued onto a rim

Clincher: Its a tire that clinches into a rim, hence the term “clincher”. Cars, motorcycles and basically every tire you see is a clincher.

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Tubeless: Its a tire being run without an inner tube. Car tires are tubeless. Tubular can be tube or tubeless. Clinchers can also be tube or tubeless.

Some tires hold onto the rim better than others. Some are loose and can be easily popped in/out. Others are hard and takes a lot of force to break open the bead.


So a clincher takes more force to break the bead? Why aren’t all tubeless tires clinchers? Also curious how it works. Thanks for the info!


What is a clincher tire? - Pinkbike Forum the-one1

Posted: Oct 21, 2020 at 9:21 Quote
You’re still misunderstanding the terms.

Tubeless: It just means a tire without a tube inside to hold the air.

Clincher: its a tire that that is not shaped like a tube. A clincher tire can be made to run tubeless or with a tube.

Here’s another article with better pictures.

https://www.superroadbikes.com/clincher-vs-tubular-vs-tubeless-how-to-chooes_n19


What is a clincher tire? - Pinkbike Forum Sayshell

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Posted: Oct 21, 2020 at 9:29 Quote
the-one1 wrote:
You’re still misunderstanding the terms.

Tubeless: It just means a tire without a tube inside to hold the air.

Clincher: its a tire that that is not shaped like a tube. A clincher tire can be made to run tubeless or with a tube.

Here’s another article with better pictures.

https://www.superroadbikes.com/clincher-vs-tubular-vs-tubeless-how-to-chooes_n19


Again this article seems to explain that tubeless and clinchers are mutually exclusive. What I just want to know is does a tubeless clincher have a stronger bead, than a tubeless n0n-clincher. Most tubeless tires aren’t advertised as clinchers, a couple are.


What is a clincher tire? - Pinkbike Forum the-one1

Posted: Oct 21, 2020 at 12:30 Quote
A tubeless non-clincher is a tubular.

A clincher can be tubeless, and tubeless can be a clincher.

A clincher is a tire shaped like a letter “C” if you were to cut it and look at it from front

I think what you’re looking at it the strength of the bead comparing one brand/model to another.

Back in the earl days on tubeless, there was UST tubeless. It was started by Mavic and defined specs on how the bead of a tire and the bead seat of a rim should be. It paved way for “tubeless ready” tires. Tubeless ready tire specs are all over the map. The tightness of the bead between brands and even between models within the brands differ a lot. Due to this, some beads are super tight on some rims, while others were very loose.

Lastly, the reason some tires are not advertised as clinchers is that its a given if a tire is a clincher or not. If its a mountain bike tire, 100% its a clincher.


What is a clincher tire? - Pinkbike Forum Sayshell

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Posted: Oct 21, 2020 at 13:01 Quote
the-one1 wrote:
A tubeless non-clincher is a tubular.

A clincher can be tubeless, and tubeless can be a clincher.

A clincher is a tire shaped like a letter “C” if you were to cut it and look at it from front

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I think what you’re looking at it the strength of the bead comparing one brand/model to another.

Back in the earl days on tubeless, there was UST tubeless. It was started by Mavic and defined specs on how the bead of a tire and the bead seat of a rim should be. It paved way for “tubeless ready” tires. Tubeless ready tire specs are all over the map. The tightness of the bead between brands and even between models within the brands differ a lot. Due to this, some beads are super tight on some rims, while others were very loose.

Lastly, the reason some tires are not advertised as clinchers is that its a given if a tire is a clincher or not. If its a mountain bike tire, 100% its a clincher.


Gotcha. Yeah I think it must just be these particular tires have a good bead rather than because they are advertised as a clincher. Thanks for the info.


What is a clincher tire? - Pinkbike Forum SLBIKES

Posted: Oct 21, 2020 at 13:31 Quote
ALL tires are clinchers unless they are tubular or sew ups or glued on. Almost 99.9 percent of all tires in mt biking are clincher, there is no need to advertise that fact. If you need a tubular tire your rim will be almost flat across and a clincher tire will not even be able to mount.

What is a clincher tire? - Pinkbike Forum Sayshell

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Posted: Oct 21, 2020 at 13:51 Quote
SLBIKES wrote:
ALL tires are clinchers unless they are tubular or sew ups or glued on. Almost 99.9 percent of all tires in mt biking are clincher, there is no need to advertise that fact. If you need a tubular tire your rim will be almost flat across and a clincher tire will not even be able to mount.

Thanks! I guess minions just have really great bead bite.


What is a clincher tire? - Pinkbike Forum R-M-R

Posted: Oct 21, 2020 at 14:34 Quote
• If a tire has beads – the ridges at the edges that interact with the rim – it’s a clincher. It refers to how the tire mounts on the rim, which dictates how the tire is constructed. “Clincher” is a noun (mounting type), not an adjective that describes how well it grips. I can tell you’ve never even seen a tubular tire, which isn’t surprising, as they’re rare, especially in mountain biking.

• Some clinchers have steel beads (different from steel belts in car tires; belts are broad strips within the casing layers), some have aramid (Kevlar), some have carbon fibre, but they all have beads.

• Some clinchers are tube-type (require a tube) and some are tubeless. These are the inflation methods, not the mounting methods.

• Some tires are a bit undersized or oversized – and the same is true of rims – which changes how tightly the tire fits on the rims. That’s just an issues of design and tolerances.

• Some tire beads and rim bead-hooks / bead-lips have slightly different shapes that are better or worse and interlocking. Again, this is just a subtle design issue. It’s not a fundamental difference in mounting type like clincher vs. tubular.

Below is a cross-section of a tubular tire. Notice:

1. It’s fully enclosed, not open, like a clincher.

2. There are no beads on the edges.

3. The stitches at the bottom. The tire is sewn together around the tube. If you get a flat, you literally have to rip the stitches, repair the tube, and sew it back together. That’s after you rip it off the rim, which is hugely difficult because it was glued onto the rim. Might as well throw away your whole bike if you get a flat! (Joking, but only a little.)


Below is a tubular rim. Notice there’s nothing for the tire to hook onto. After applying glue to the rim and tire, you have to stretch – with great force – the fully closed, sewn-up tire onto the rim. Hope you got it perfectly straight, or you’re ripping the now-glued tire off and doing it again!


If this sounds insane, that’s because it is. It’s heinous. It’s utterly outdated. Unfortunately, many decades ago, it was the only option before we were able to reliably hold the necessary tolerances to create safe clincher rims and tires. Automotive tires adopted the clincher design first and bikes followed much later.

The only people still using tubulars:

• Retro enthusiasts.

• Extreme weight nerds, as tubular rims + tires are usually slightly lighter.

• Top professional road cyclists who have mechanics to prepare a fleet of tubular wheels and support vehicles following the race. When flat, a tubular nicely covers the rim and won’t roll off, so they can ride a flat tubular for a couple of minutes until the support vehicle can get to the rider, minimizing time loss.

Below is another image that sums it all up. Note the “clincher” is actually a tube-type clincher and the “tubeless” is a tubeless clincher. They’re both clinchers.


What is a clincher tire? - Pinkbike Forum Sayshell

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Posted: Oct 22, 2020 at 2:34 Quote
Thanks RMR that is very helpful! Yeah I guess being a clincher has nothing to do with bead strength, and it’s just silly to advertise it in the MTB world. It’s confusing because most the articles I read said tubeless and clincher are mutually exclusive.

What is a clincher tire? - Pinkbike Forum R-M-R

Posted: Oct 22, 2020 at 12:02 Quote
Yes, that’s just sloppy terminology on their part. We should call them “tubed clinchers” and “tubeless-compatible clinchers”.

It’s a bit like how “aluminum alloy” was incorrectly shortened to “alloy”, instead of “aluminum”, resulting in uninformed people referring to “alloy” frames, when every metal frame is “alloy”, including steel, titanium, and magnesium frames.


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